Travellers with access needs are more likely to require specialist resources - to ascertain accessibility - before travelling.

Man sitting in a wheelchair in a doorway surrounded by intricate wood panel carvingsTravellers with access needs are more likely to require specialist resources - to ascertain accessibility - before travelling.

In some cases, much advanced planning is needed, not just to check for accessible hotel rooms, but also for the accessibility of the public transport network and the tourist sites people want to see.

Lonely Planet’s aim is to provide accurate and reliable information to enable travellers to travel independently and get to the heart of places they visit.

“We launched our Travel for All Initiative in 2013 in order to broaden the opportunities for travel to everyone, no matter what their limitations or abilities,” says Martin Heng, Lonely Planet’s Accessible Travel Manager, and currently the IDEAS Chairperson.

This collection of online resources – collated by Martin over the course of more than three years – is the world’s largest list of online resources for accessible travel.

This edition has almost doubled in size – its 170 pages are packed with indispensable links to help you research, plan and enjoy a trip no matter where in the world you are or want to go.

It features hundreds of new entries, including coverage of several new countries, including the Czech Republic, Iceland and India.

Product information: Lonely Planet Shop

Also Available